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Casa Mila, Barcelona, Spain — Fotopedia
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Barcelona

Barcelona (English /bɑrsɨˈlnə/, Catalan: [bərsəˈɫonə], Spanish: [barθeˈlona]) is the capital city of the autonomous community of Catalonia in Spain and the country's 2nd largest city, with a population of 1.6 million within its administrative limits. Its urban area extends beyond the administrative city limits with a population of around 4.5 million people, being the sixth-most populous urban area in the European Union after Paris, London, the Ruhr area, Madrid and Milan. About five million people live in the Barcelona metropolitan area. It is the largest metropolis on the Mediterranean Sea, located on the coast between the mouths of the rivers Llobregat and Besòs, and bounded to the west by the Serra de Collserola mountain range, the tallest peak of which is 512 metres (1,680 ft) high.


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Casa Milà

Casa Milà (Catalan pronunciation: [ˈkəzə miˈɫa], Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkasa miˈla]), better known as La Pedrera (pronounced: [ɫə pəˈðɾeɾə], meaning the 'The Quarry'), is a modernist building located at 92, Passeig de Gràcia (passeig is Catalan for promenade) in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain , at the corner of Carrer de Provença, in the Eixample. It was the last civil work designed by catalan architect Antoni Gaudi and it was built between the years 1906 and 1910. In 1912, Gaudí and the Milà i Segimon marriage signed the contract of completion of the work of the Casa Milà.

It was commissioned by businessman Pere Milà i Camps and his wife Roser Segimon i Artells , from Reus and widow of the wealthy Indian Josep Guardiola i Grau. At the time it was very controversial because of the bold undulating stone facade and twisted wrought iron that decorate the balconies and windows, designed mostly by Josep Maria Jujol, who also designed some of the skies of plaster.

Architecturally it is considered an innovative work by having a structure of columns and floors free of load bearing walls. Similarly, the front – which is made of stone – is also self-supporting, ie, not loads of floors. Another innovative element was the construction of the underground garage.


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