0
 

Pleiospilos nelii or Split Rock, Rutgers Gardens, New Brunswick NJ - USA

photo by Anna Strumillo88.7k

Pleiospilos nelii or Split Rock, Rutgers Gardens, New Brunswick NJ - USA — Fotopedia
no description yet
Wikipedia Article
See encyclopedia photos — 
Pleiospilos

Pleiospilos is a genus of succulent flowering plants of the Aizoaceae family, native to South Africa. The name is derived from the Greek pleios "many" and spìlos "spot". The plants are also known as kwaggavy (Quagga mesemb), lewerplant (liver plant), lewervygie (liver mesemb), klipplant (stone plant), split rock or mimicry plant.

Pleiospilos species have two or four opposite, very fleshy, grey-green leaves growing from a short stem that may be underground. The leaves, with their hemispherical shape and pitted texture, often strongly resemble a pile of split pebbles to deter predators. Flowers emerge from the center of the leaves, and may be very big in relation to the overall size of the plant.

They reproduce both sexually and asexually. Vegetative offshoots emerge from the root system. Seed set occurs in early spring around March.[citation needed]

The species P. bolusii and P. nelii are cultivated as ornamentals.


See encyclopedia photos — 
Lithops

Lithops is a genus of succulent plants in the ice plant family, Aizoaceae. Members of the genus are native to southern Africa. The name is derived from the Ancient Greek words λίθος (lithos), meaning "stone," and ὄψ (ops), meaning "face," referring to the stone-like appearance of the plants. They avoid being eaten by blending in with surrounding rocks and are often known as pebble plants or living stones. The formation of the name from the Greek "-ops" means that even a single plant is called a Lithops.


See encyclopedia photos — 
Succulent plant

In botany, succulent plants, also known as succulents or sometimes fat plants, are plants having some parts that are more than normally thickened and fleshy, usually to retain water in arid climates or soil conditions. Succulent plants may store water in various structures, such as leaves and stems. Some definitions also include roots, so that geophytes that survive unfavorable periods by dying back to underground storage organs may be regarded as succulents. In horticultural use, the term "succulent" is often used in a way which excludes plants that botanists would regard as succulents, such as cacti. Succulents are grown as ornamental plants because of their striking and unusual appearance.


Icon_album_items Albums