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2012.07.01 台中 / 高美濕地 — Fotopedia
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Qingshui District

Qingshui District (Chinese: 清水區; pinyin: Qīngshuǐ Qū) is a coastal suburban district in western Taichung City, Taiwan. The ancient name was "Niu Ma Tou."(牛罵頭) It is located at the foothills of Ao Feng mountain and faces the Taiwan Strait. Its neighbors are Dajia, Shalu, Waipu, Shengang, and Wuqi Districts. Gao-Mei marsh is its most famous natural attraction. It is a good place to research birds, plants, and the ecology of creatures in the marsh.

Qingshui can be accessed by the TRA Qingshui Station or Taichung Port Station on the Western Line. The National Highway 3 also passes through Qingshui, and the Qingshui rest station is located here.


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Sunset

Sunset or sundown is the daily disappearance of the Sun below the western half of the horizon, i.e. at an azimuth greater than 180 degrees, as a result of Earth's rotation.

The time of sunset is defined in astronomy as the moment when the trailing edge of the Sun's disk disappears below the horizon. The ray path of light from the setting Sun is highly distorted near the horizon because of atmospheric refraction, making the sunset appear to occur when the Sun’s disk is already about one diameter below the horizon. Sunset is distinct from dusk, which is the time at which the sky becomes completely dark, which occurs when the Sun is approximately eighteen degrees below the horizon. The period between sunset and dusk is called twilight.

Locations north of the Arctic Circle and south of the Antarctic Circle experience no sunset or sunrise at least one day of the year, when the polar day or the polar night persists continuously for 24 hours.

Sunset creates unique atmospheric conditions such as the often intense orange and red colors of the Sun and the surrounding sky.


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Wind turbine

A wind turbine is a device that converts kinetic energy from the wind into electrical power. A wind turbine used for charging batteries may be referred to as a wind charger.

The result of over a millennium of windmill development and modern engineering, today's wind turbines are manufactured in a wide range of vertical and horizontal axis types. The smallest turbines are used for applications such as battery charging for auxiliary power for boats or caravans or to power traffic warning signs. Slightly larger turbines can be used for making small contributions to a domestic power supply while selling unused power back to the utility supplier via the electrical grid. Arrays of large turbines, known as wind farms, are becoming an increasingly important source of renewable energy and are used by many countries as part of a strategy to reduce their reliance on fossil fuels.


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Wind power

Wind power is the conversion of wind energy into a useful form of energy, such as using wind turbines to make electrical power, windmills for mechanical power, windpumps for water pumping or drainage, or sails to propel ships.

Large wind farms consist of hundreds of individual wind turbines which are connected to the electric power transmission network. For new constructions, onshore wind is an inexpensive source of electricity, competitive with or in many places cheaper than fossil fuel plants. Small onshore wind farms provide electricity to isolated locations. Utility companies increasingly buy surplus electricity produced by small domestic wind turbines. Offshore wind is steadier and stronger than on land, and offshore farms have less visual impact, but construction and maintenance costs are considerably higher.

Wind power, as an alternative to fossil fuels, is plentiful, renewable, widely distributed, clean, produces no greenhouse gas emissions during operation and uses little land. The effects on the environment are generally less problematic than those from other power sources. As of 2011, Denmark is generating more than a quarter of its electricity from wind and 83 countries around the world are using wind power to supply the electricity grid. In 2010 wind energy production was over 2.5% of total worldwide electricity usage, and growing rapidly at more than 25% per annum.


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Silhouette

A silhouette is the image of a person, animal, object or scene represented as a solid shape of a single colour, usually black, its edges matching the outline of the subject. The interior of a silhouette is featureless, and the whole is typically presented on a light background, usually white, or none at all. The silhouette differs from an outline which depicts the edge of an object in a linear form, while a silhouette appears as a solid shape. Silhouette images may be created in any visual artistic media, but the term normally describes pieces of cut paper, which were then stuck to a backing in a contrasting colour, and often framed.

Cutting portraits, generally in profile, from black card became popular in the mid-18th century, though the term “silhouette” was seldom used until the early decades of the 19th century, and the tradition has continued under this name into the 21st century. They represented a cheap but effective alternative to the portrait miniature, and skilled specialist artists could cut a high-quality bust portrait, by far the most common style, in a matter of minutes, working purely by eye. Other artists, especially from about 1790, drew an outline on paper, then painted it in, which could be equally quick. The leading 18th-century English "profilist" in painting, John Miers, advertised "three minute sittings", and the cost might be as low as half a crown around 1800. Miers' superior products could be in grisaille, with delicate highlights added in gold or yellow, and some examples might be painted on various backings, including gesso, glass or ivory. The size was normally small, with many designed to fit into a locket, but otherwise a bust some 3 to 5 inches high was typical, with half- or full-length portraits proportionately larger.


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Wind power in Asia

Wind power in Asia has a total generating capacity of 10,600 MW. The strongest market is China with 12,210 MW of installed capacity. India is the second largest market in Asia with an installed capacity of 9,587 MW.

China more than doubled its total wind power capacity by installing 1,347 MW of wind energy in 2006, a 70% increase from the 2005 figure. This brings China up to 2,604 MW of capacity at the end of 2006, making it the sixth largest market world wide. The Chinese market was boosted by the country’s new Renewable Energy Law, which entered into force on 1 January 2006. China continued its rapid expansion of wind power capacity in 2007 and 2008, and now has a total of about 9000 MW of wind power, with 4,000 MW being installed in 2008 alone.

Other key countries include Japan (1,394 MW), Taiwan (188 MW), South Korea (173 MW) and the Philippines (33 MW).


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Energy in Taiwan

Taiwan lacks energy resources and highly depends on import, so it is a top priority to develop clean, sustainable, and independent energy and achieve the balance among energy security, environmental protection, and industrial competitiveness, and reduce CO2 emissions through various strategies. Taiwan relies on imports for more than 98 percent of its energy, which leaves the island's energy supply vulnerable to external disruption. In order to reduce this dependence, the Ministry of Economic Affairs' Bureau of Energy has been actively promoting energy research at several universities since the 1990s.

As of 2010, in Taiwan, oil accounts for 49.0% of the total energy consumption. Coal comes next with 32.1%, followed by nuclear energy with 8.3%, natural gas (indigenous and liquefied) with 10.2%, and energy from renewable sources with 0.5%. Taiwan has 6 reactors and two under construction.


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Taichung

Taichung (臺中 or 台中; literally "Central Taiwan"), officially known as Taichung City, is a city located in western Taiwan, with a population of just over 2.6 million people, making it the third largest city on the island after New Taipei City and Kaohsiung. On 25 December 2010, it merged with Taichung County to form a single special municipality. The city's motto is "economic, cultural and international city."